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  • Writer's pictureThe Bridge Sisters

Changing the Things We Cannot Longer Accept: Three Steps You Can Take to Contribute to Social Justice in Your Profession | World Day of Social Justice

Updated: Feb 17


Illustration of three women of color with the quote “I am no longer accepting the things I cannot change.   I am changing the things I cannot accept.” from Angela Davis.
“I am no longer accepting the things I cannot change. I am changing the things I cannot accept.” -Angela Davis
This day is a powerful reminder of our collective responsibility to use our social, economic, academic, and/or geographical privileges to dismantle and transform systems of oppression that create and sustain social inequities.





As we gear up to celebrate World Day of Social Justice on February 20th, we are reminded of a pivotal moment in our careers three years ago. Outraged by the glaring inequalities unveiled by the pandemic —especially for women in the Global South and immigrant women in the US— we gathered the courage to start our entrepreneurial journey as The Bridge Sisters. In a sort of social experiment meant to redefine the traditional approach to business, we founded a social impact consulting firm rooted in feminist values. This model allows us to advance social justice by leveraging the roles that we play in our communities and the projects we support and lead.


This day is a powerful reminder of our collective responsibility to use our social, economic, academic, and/or geographical privileges to dismantle and transform systems of oppression that create and sustain social inequities. By leveraging our access and influence, we can drive meaningful change in our communities. Here’s how you can contribute to this vital transformation.


Three Steps to Advance Social Justice in Your Profession: 


  1. Amplify Marginalized Voices: Embrace the power of your platform and amplify voices that often go unheard. Ensure that the professional discussions you lead center the perspectives, experiences, and knowledge of BIPOC, immigrants, LGBTIQA+ individuals, and other marginalized people. Encourage colleagues from these communities to share their experiences. Give them your undivided attention and actively listen with the intention of learning. Avoid making assumptions or speaking on their behalf based on what you think you know about their experiences. This small yet impactful step helps break down systemic biases and promotes a culture of equality. Actively seek their perspectives, and support their work, ideas, businesses, and contributions.  

  2. Advocate for Inclusive Policies: Advocate for policies that promote inclusivity within your workplace. This involves acknowledging and considering diversity in gender, origin, and economic, social, and cultural backgrounds to accommodate individuals' needs and determine how your team will work and relate to each other. Whether it's pushing for parental leave policies, or anti-discrimination measures, be a catalyst for change. It's about creating an environment where everyone is fairly compensated, treated equally, and feels valued and respected. 

  3. Challenge Your Bias, Educate Yourself, and Share with Those Who May Benefit from That Knowledge: Education is a powerful tool in the fight for social justice. However, it only works when you challenge your own beliefs. This is because many of them are influenced by stereotypes imposed by patriarchy, racism, capitalism, and other systems of oppression that were part of our upbringing. Once you do that, you can seek information about the challenges faced by marginalized communities. Perhaps you can attend workshops, read literature from diverse authors, and engage in conversations that broaden your understanding. Whether you choose academic or non-academic sources, make sure that they are authored by the voices of those marginalized. Once you've equipped yourself with knowledge, become an advocate for education within your professional circles. Share resources, initiate discussions, and foster a culture of continuous learning. 

Bonus: Other practical ways to help may include donating, volunteering, and supporting nonprofits and activists that work to advance social justice; voting for individuals that represent the best interest of marginalized communities; running for office if that’s your call; or considering limiting your consumption of products sold by big corporations with practices and policies detrimental for their employees or the environment.  

While practicing these actions be fully aware of all your privileges –especially if you are a white person living in the Global North– and your position of power in relationship with the actions you're taking to advance justice for vulnerable communities. Understand that you are not superior to them. Don’t assume that your actions are meant to rescue others. Act with respect to their backgrounds and identities, recognizing that you don’t know better than them. Most importantly, understand that they don’t owe you anything, as they have been oppressed by the very same systems that have granted you the privileges you enjoy today.


Let World Day of Social Justice be a reminder that we no longer have to accept injustice. We must continue looking for ways to use our voice, work, professional platforms, and any other privilege we may have to contribute to the creation of justice and equity for all.  




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